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Effect of crude oil pollution on the rhizosphere microbial communities of Mangifera indica L and Elaeis guineensis Jacq in Rivers State, Nigeria

Chima Uzoma Darlington, Omokhua Godwin Ejakhe, Njoku Ogechi

Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Key words: Trees, rhizosphere, bacteria, fungi, crude oil pollution.

Abstract

palm-trees1This study investigated the effect of crude oil pollution and remediation on the fungi and bacteria communities of M. indica and E. guineensis rhizospheres using three sites – Unpolluted Site (UPS), Polluted and Treated Site (PTS), and Polluted and Untreated Site (PUS). Population of fungi in both M. indica and E. guineensis rhizospheres was highest in UPS while the bacteria population was highest in PUS and UPS in M. indica and E. guineensis rhizospheres, respectively. The highest similarity in fungi species was observed between UPS/PTS (67%) and PTS/PUS (87%) in M. indica and E. guineensis rhizospheres, respectively. Similarity in bacteria species was highest between UPS/PTS (50%) in M. indica rhizosphere while it was highest between UPS/PUS (60%) and PTS/PUS (60%) in E. guineensis rhizosphere. The diversity of fungi was highest at UPS in both M. indica (H ꞊ 1.04; Simpson 1-D ꞊ 0.63) and E. guineensis (H ꞊ 1.17; Simpson 1-D ꞊ 0.67) rhizospheres. Bacteria diversity in M. indica rhizosphere was highest in PUS (H ꞊ 0.70) when Shannon-Wiener index was used but highest in PTS (Simpson 1-D ꞊ 0.42) when Simpson index was used; and highest in PTS (H ꞊ 039; Simpson 1-D ꞊ 0.20) for E. guineensis rhizosphere. Most of the evaluated attributes compared better in UPS; however, bacteria population and diversity in M. indica rhizosphere was highest in PUS and PTS, respectively.

Get the original articles: http://www.innspub.net/volume-6-number-4-april-2015-jbes/

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